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People often ask questions about Street Creep, or Concrete Creep, and what it really is. This time of year when there is record high temperatures is the perfect time to talk about this phenomenon that can cause problems with foundations.

Street Creep is the action of concrete moving as it heats up and expands. When concrete is cool, it shrinks and allows debris to fall down in cracks and control joints. This is especially common in midwestern winters where cold temperatures cause the shrinkage of the roads, and sand/gravel trucks spread plenty of debris to fill those open joints in the concrete.

When the Spring and Summer temperatures start to go up, the concrete expands and creates pressure all around. When the joints around the slab are filled with hard debris they don't allow any expansion of the concrete and therefore the concrete actually pushes on the next slab.

When you multiply that over the many sections of concrete in a street you can see that the road will actually get longer. If your driveway is near the end of this run of concrete slabs, the pressure is transferred through your driveway and into your house. The best way to prevent damage is to maintain proper expansion joints in the driveway, but if damage has already occurred a foundation repair may be needed.